Total Solar Eclipse Crosses the US for 1st Time in 99 Years

Americans across the country brought out their telescopes and viewing glasses as a total solar eclipse crossed the United States from coast to coast for the first time in 99 years on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. The path of totality, which lasted an hour and a half on land, entered through Oregon and left through South Carolina. See photos from around the country.

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NBC
Only a sliver of sun remains during the eclipse.
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NASA via Twitter
The shadow of the moon on the earth during eclipse, as seen from the International Space Station. The Twitter account wrote: "Millions of people saw #Eclipse2017 but only six people saw the umbra, or the moon's shadow, over the United States from space today."
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Drew Angerer/Getty Images
The solar eclipse at 'Top of the Rock' observatory at Rockefeller Center, August 21, 2017, in New York City. While New York City is not in the path of totality for the solar eclipse, around 72 percent of the sun was covered by the moon during the peak time of the eclipse.
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Spencer Platt/Getty Images
People watch a partial solar eclipse from the roof deck at 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge on Aug. 21, 2017, in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. While New York City isn't in the path of today's total solar eclipse, thousands of residents and tourists alike participated in the excitement by using special glasses to view the unique occurrence.
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Andrew Harnik/AP
Ivanka Trump, the daughter of President Donald Trump, wears protective glasses as she viewed the solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, at the White House in Washington.
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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP
Vice President Mike Pence, with students from Cornerstone Schools, watches the solar eclipse, Monday, August 21, 2017, at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington.
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AP
President Donald Trump points skyward before donning protective glasses to view the solar eclipse, Monday, August 21, 2017, at the White House in Washington.
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Andrew Harnik/AP
President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump wear protective glasses as they view the solar eclipse, Monday, August 21, 2017, at the White House in Washington.
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John Locher/AP
A person jumps off the top of the Stratosphere hotel and casino tower on the SkyJump ride during the solar eclipse Monday, August 21, 2017, in Las Vegas.
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NBC
A pink glare is visible as the sun moves past the moon during the total solar eclipse.
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AP
A crowd gathers in front of the Hollywood sign at the Griffith Observatory to watch the solar eclipse in Los Angeles on Monday, August 21, 2017.
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NBC
The sun flares behind the moon during the total solar eclipse.
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NBC News
The moon eclipses the sun in Oregon.
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Nati Harnik/AP
Chuck Willard of Council Bluffs, Iowa, reads a tourist magazine as he waits in the bed of his truck for the total eclipse in Falls City, Nebraska, Monday, August 21, 2017. Willard, who works for Menards, blocked off this day many months in advance so he could view the eclipse. He decided to come to Falls City hoping the cloud cover here would be the lightest.
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NBC
The moon covers most of the sun as the eclipse is underway.
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Don Ryan/AP
Catalina Gaitan, from Portland, Oregon, tries to shoot a photo of the rising sun through her eclipse glasses at a gathering of eclipse viewers in Salem, Oregon, Monday, August 21, 2017.
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Don Ryan/AP
Griffin O'Roak watches the rising sun with his homemade eclipse viewer at a gathering of eclipse viewers in Salem, Oregon, Monday, August 21, 2017.
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NBC
The eclipse begins its North American journey in Oregon.
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Andrew Selsky/AP
Jonathan Moric and Finn Power of Vancouver, Washington get ready to watch the eclipse Monday, August 21, 2017, in a park in Salem, Oregon.
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Scott Olson/Getty
Campers, in town to view the solar eclipse, relax at their indoor campsites on the campus of Southern Illinois University the evening before Monday's solar eclipse on Aug. 20, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Four hundred campers paid $40-per-night to camp in the gymnasium. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse.
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Mark Humphrey/AP
A woman who goes by the name of The Voodoo Bone Lady of New Orleans handles snakes as she sits in the campground set up for viewing the solar eclipse at the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Kentucky, Monday, August 21, 2017. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity. The woman said she has come to the eclipse viewing site "to do a ritual for peace and for unity."
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Owen Humphreys/PA Images via Getty Images
Virgin Atlantic Cabin Crew and Pilots take a selfie as they check their solar glasses on the ground at London's Heathrow airport ahead of their flight VS5 to Miami, USA, during which they are expected to fly through the area of totality of the solar eclipse.
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RJ Sangosti/Denver Post via Getty Images
Stargazers watch the night sky as they camp near Carhenge on August 20, 2017, in Alliance, Nebraska. People are gathering near Carhenge to watch the upcoming total solar eclipse.
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Sean Rayford/Getty Images
Dana Hamerschlag tests out a pair of eclipse glasses at the South Carolina State Museum August 20, 2017, in Columbia, South Carolina. Columbia is one of the prime destinations for viewing Monday's solar eclipse and NASA expects clear weather to bring over a million visitors to the state.
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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Tattoo artist Alessandra Sheppard, right, gives Justice Angell a tattoo of an eclipse at Sparxworx on August 20, 2017, in Casper, Wyoming. Thousands of people have descended on Casper, Wyoming to see the solar eclipse in the path of totality as it passes over the state on August 21.
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George Frey/Getty Images
Penny Farster-Narlesky from Denver, Colorado, looks at her solar eclipse glasses at a roadside information center in Grand Teton National Park on August 20, 2017, outside Jackson, Wyoming. People are flocking to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse since it will be one of the areas that will experience totality on Monday.
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Scott Olson/Getty Images
A vendor sells solar eclipse stickers on August 19, 2017, in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes, 40 seconds of totality, the area in southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.
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AP Photo/Mark Humphrey
A family sets up a tent at their campsite at sunrise for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Kentucky. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity.
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Sean Rayford/Getty Images
Children watch a presentation about the eclipse during a drive-in movie at the Historic Columbia Speedway, August 20, 2017, in Columbia, South Carolina. Columbia is one of the prime destinations for viewing Monday's solar eclipse and NASA expects clear weather would bring over a million visitors to the state.
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Scott Olson/Getty Images
A 15-foot-tall statue of Superman wears solar eclipse glasses on August 18, 2017, in Metropolis, Illinois. Metropolis is located along the eclipse path of totality in southern Illinois.
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Mic Smith/AP
Ezra Packham, of Jacksonville, Florida, looks through his solar glasses in preparation for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the beach at Isle of Palms, South Carolina. Ezra and his family said the wanted to come to the Isle of Palms because they wanted to be on the beach and the city of Isle of Palms was giving away solar glasses.
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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
A visitor puts a pin on map to show where she is visiting from during the Wyoming Eclipse Festival on Aug. 20, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Thousands of people have descended on Casper, Wyoming, to see the solar eclipse in the path of totality as it passes over the state on August 21.
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Sean Rayford/Getty Images
An employee arranges eclipse merchandise at Mast General Store Aug. 20, 2017, in Columbia, South Carolina. Columbia is one of the prime destinations for viewing Monday's solar eclipse and NASA expects clear weather to bring over a million visitors to the state.
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