Going Nowhere: Boston by Way of Bus

The MBTA bus system has been long-neglected and advocates say poor and black riders have been hurt the most. Some call it a civil rights issue and say changes must come fast.

13 photos
1/13
Mark Garfinkel
Ninety-two percent of MBTA bus stops do not have shelters.
2/13
Mark Garfinkel
A study by the public Metropolitan Area Planning Council found black MBTA bus riders spend 64 hours a year longer on the bus than white MBTA bus riders. That’s a week-and-a-half of work.
3/13
Mark Garfinkel
Advocates say routes that serve mostly poor and black neighborhoods are less reliable and come less frequently
4/13
Mark Garfinkel
Last year, the MBTA launched the Better Bus Project aiming to fix the ailing system.
5/13
Alicia Bowman
Viewer Alicia Bowman says people wait up to 20-30 minutes for the #60 bus in Chestnut Hill. Many of the riders are seniors and the stop has no shelter or a place to sit.
6/13
Brendan Kearney
Brendan Kearney says the 70/70a often gets stuck in, "SO MUCH traffic" crossing the Charles. Kearney now takes the 71 bus which is, "faster and reliable."
7/13
@nofunfinn
One viewer says it's a challenge for parents to take multiple modes of transportation with children.
8/13
@nofunfinn
Some people park in bus lanes making it difficult for operators and commuters.
9/13
@bosoxsara
One viewer says the #77 near Porter Square, "never arrives on time."
10/13
Jim Sestito
MBTA bus riders are frustrated with no dedicated bus lanes, resulting in longer commutes.
11/13
Commuters are unhappy with long wait times.
12/13
Sarah Aspinwall
Viewer Sarah Aspinwall shared her frustration with the #39 bus during commuting hours. She says that passengers must cross stopped traffic in order to get on and off the bus.
13/13
Alexander Frieden
Bus bunching in Central Square after riders waited 20 minutes for the bus.
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