Juno’s Journey to Jupiter The View From Above the Gas Giant

Juno was launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida on Aug. 5, 2011, and successfully entered the orbit of Jupiter on July 4, 2016. The projects goal is to study the planet's formation, evolution and structure. The key event was a 35-minute engine burn when it entered Jupiter's orbit, which slowed Juno down enough to be captured by Jupiter's powerful gravity. In August 2016 Juno started transmitting unprecedented, up-close photos of the gas giant.

22 photos
1/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill
Colorful swirling cloud belts dominate Jupiter’s southern hemisphere in this image captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft.
2/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill
You can see intricate cloud patterns in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter in this image from NASA’s Juno spacecraft. The color-enhanced image was taken on April 1, 2018.
3/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Matt Brealey/Gustavo B C
This image shows a close-up view of a storm with bright cloud tops in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter. This color-enhanced image on Feb. 7 , 2018.
4/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill
Colorful swirling cloud belts dominate Jupiter’s southern hemisphere in this image captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft.
5/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/ Seán Doran
Jovian clouds in striking shades of blue in this new view taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft.
6/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/ Seán Doran
NASA’s Juno spacecraft was a little more than one Earth diameter from Jupiter when it captured this mind-bending, color-enhanced view of the planet’s tumultuous atmosphere.
7/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/ Seán Doran
This image taken Oct. 24, 2017 shows Jupiter's southern hemisphere. The image has been color-enhanced to show the rotating storms, signature features of the giant gas planet.
8/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/ Seán Doran
This image from NASA's Juno spacecraft was captured Oct. 24, 2017. The color-enhanced image shows a storm in Jupiter's northern hemisphere.
9/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt
The black dot on Jupiter in this Sept. 1, 2017 image is the moon Amalthea's shadow. This image was taken during Juno's eight close fly-by of the gas planet.
10/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Jason Major
This enhanced-color image of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Jason Major using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft.
11/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin Gill
This enhanced-color image of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Kevin Gill using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft. The image was taken on July 10, 2017 at 07:07 p.m. PDT (10:07 p.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed its 7th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 6,130 miles (9,866 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet.
12/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt
This enhanced-color image of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Gerald Eichstädt using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft. The image is approximately illumination adjusted and strongly enhanced to draw viewers’ eyes to the iconic storm and the turbulence around it. The image was taken on July 10, 2017 at 07:07 p.m. PDT (10:07 p.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed its 7th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 6,130 miles (9,866 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet.
13/22
NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, left, listens to Juno program manager for Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Tim Gasparrini, as they view the Jupiter-bound Juno spacecraft on May 5, 2011, at the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Florida.
14/22
NASA/Kenny Allen
As the sun comes up over Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, on Aug. 5, 2011, preparations are under way to launch the United Launch Alliance Atlas V-551 launch vehicle carrying NASA's Juno spacecraft.
15/22
NASA/Bill Ingalls
The Juno spacecraft, safely enclosed in the payload fairing at the top of an Atlas V rocket, began its journey to Jupiter with a spectacular midday launch on Aug. 5, 2011.
16/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
This trio of Junocam views of Earth was taken during Juno's close flyby on Oct. 9, 2013.
17/22
Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images
From left: Diane Brown, NASA Juno program executive; Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator; Juno Project manager Rick Nybakken; and Guy Beutelschies, Lockheed Martin director of space exploration, celebrate at a press conference after the Juno spacecraft was successfully placed into Jupiter's orbit, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California on July 4, 2016.
18/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
Storm systems and weather activity unlike anything encountered in the solar system are on view in this color image taken on Aug. 27, 2016, of Jupiter's north polar region from NASA's Juno spacecraft.
19/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
This image from NASA's Juno spacecraft taken on Aug. 27, 2016, provides a never-before-seen perspective on Jupiter's south pole.
20/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/ASI/INAF/JIRAM
This infrared image gives an unprecedented view of the southern aurora of Jupiter, as captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft on Aug. 27, 2016.
21/22
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
This montage of 10 JunoCam images shows Jupiter growing and shrinking in apparent size before and after NASA's Juno spacecraft made its closest approach on Aug. 27, 2016.
22/22
Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images
A 1/5th size scale model of NASA's Juno spacecraft is displayed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.
Contact Us