Tagging Sharks With the Atlantic Shark Conservatory

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Rob Michaelson
Gregory Skomal looks out on the ocean from his favorite spot on the boat.
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(From left to right) Cynthia Wigren, Gregory Skomal and Megan Winton patiently wait for the next shark sighting.
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Rob Michaelson
Marine biologist Gregory Skomal looks out on the ocean from his favorite spot on the boat.
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Rob Michaelson
Captain John King pilots the ship that chases down the sharks.
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Rob Michaelson
Cynthia Wigren and Gregory Skomal on the hunt for their finned friends.
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Rob Michaelson
Megan Winton, PhD student at UMass Dartmouth, looking over data they have gotten from the sharks.
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Rob Michaelson
Gregory Skomal getting ready for another day on the ocean he loves.
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Rob Michaelson
Cynthia Wigren uses a device that can detect sharks in the water.
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Rob Michaelson
Gregory Skomal kicks back while the team waits for their plane to spot another shark.
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Rob Michaelson
The team uses GoPros to grab footage of the sharks they come across.
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Rob Michaelson
Gregory Skomal enjoying the traditional 10 a.m. snack time that the team has when they go out chasing sharks.
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Rob Michaelson
The Atlantic Shark Conservatory has a lot of friends both below and above the water.
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Rob Michaelson
Members of the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy crew on their hunt to find sharks to research.
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Rob Michaelson
These seals are the reason sharks like to hang out in this part of the ocean.
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Rob Michaelson
Megan Winton, PhD student at UMass Dartmouth, looks out on the ocean.
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Rob Michaelson
Captain John King guides the team on their search for sharks.
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Rob Michaelson
This protected beach area has turned into a seal hangout (and a buffet for sharks.)
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