Health Officials Warn of Possible Hepatitis A Exposure at Rockport Seafood Restaurant - NBC10 Boston

Health Officials Warn of Possible Hepatitis A Exposure at Rockport Seafood Restaurant

Anyone who may have eaten at Roy Moore's Fish Shack between April 21 and May 12 may have been exposed

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Diners Warned About Hepatitis A Diagnosis

    A confirmed case of Hepatitis A at a Rockport seafood restaurant prompted a warning for patrons.

    (Published Friday, May 17, 2019)

    State health officials are warning of possible hepatitis A exposure for anyone who recently ate at a Rockport, Massachusetts seafood restaurant.

    The Department of Public Health is urging anyone who ate cold or uncooked food or is unsure what they ate between April 21 and May 12 at Roy Moore's Fish Shack to contact their healthcare provider because of possible exposure to hepatitis A.

    A food service employee at the restaurant who worked during those dates has a confirmed case of hepatitis A, state health officials said.

    Customers are being advised to contact their healthcare provider and receive medical treatment for possible exposure. The hepatitis A vaccine and hepatitis A immune globulin may prevent infection if administered within two weeks of exposure.

    Anyone who thinks they may have been exposed to the virus is also urged to be thorough in handwashing after using the bathroom and before any food preparation to avoid further spread of the disease.

    Cold or uncooked foods affected include salads and salad items, rolls, bread, hamburger and hot dog buns, fruit or vegetable garnishes, cold desserts, hamburger or sandwich condiments like pickles and onions, chips and ice or any beverages containing ice.

    The hepatitis A virus is spread as a result of fecal contamination and may be spread from person to person through close contact or through food handling. The virus can be spread by contaminated food and beverages.

    The early signs and symptoms of hepatitis A are fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and jaundice. The illness varies in severity, with mild cases lasting two weeks or less and more severe cases lasting four to six weeks or longer.

    For more information, contact your local health department or call the Massachusetts Department of Public Health's Bureau of Infectious Disease and Laboratory Sciences at 617-983-6800.


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