Teens in Boston Hope to Make a Difference on Gun Legislation

Thousands of teens and their allies are expected to show up on Boston Common next month for one of several gun control rallies that will be held across the country.

Many feel the passion and determination of these students may be able to accomplish what many adults have not been able to do — pass stronger gun legislation.

Julian Lopez-Leyva had an afternoon's worth of studying tucked under his arm Monday, but he had other things on his mind.

"We can no longer lose lives at the hands of legislators who have failed us consistently and consistently and consistently," he said.

Lopez-Leyva is organizing the "March for our Lives" rally on Boston Common on March 24 - part of a nationwide call to action spearheaded by the students of Stoneman Douglas High School, many of whom inspired Lopez-Leyva.

"It has always been the youth who push this country forward," he said.

The students are calling on Congress for legislative action on gun control, and activists say the teenagers have been moving the debate in a way not seen before.

Kim Long from the Massachusetts Chapter leader of "Moms Demand Action For Gun Sense In America" is happy to support the students' march, but feels it's important for the adults to back off.

"Our young people in this country are brilliant," she said. "They're smart, they're articulate, there's not one of those students who didn't stand up and speak that I wouldn't vote for for Congress tomorrow."

March For Our Lives: Boston has a Facebook page to promote the event. Monday morning, the number of people who said they were going or interested in going was at about 1,000. By Monday evening, it was nearly 20,000, with more than 3,000 planning to attend. And the march is still a month away.