In Photos: Hundreds of Abandoned Animals Saved From Euthanasia at Puerto Rico Shelters

Abandoned animals are overwhelming Puerto Rico’s shelters, which were already struggling to cope with the hundreds of thousands of stray animals that were roaming the island even before Hurricane Maria approached.

10 photos
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AP
In this Dec. 15, 2017, photo, puppies stand in a cage at the Canita Sanctuary, which houses hundreds of abandoned dogs and cats after it suffered some damage from Hurricane Maria almost three months ago, where they are protected from euthanasia in Guayama, Puerto Rico. Abandoned animals are overwhelming Puerto Rico’s shelters, which were already struggling to cope with the hundreds of thousands of stray animals that were roaming the island even before the storm approached.
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Carlos Giusti/AP
In this Dec. 15, 2017, photo, rescue dogs stands in their pens at Canita Sanctuary, where abandoned cats and dogs are protected from being euthanized, in Guayama, Puerto Rico. More than 30,000 people have lost jobs in Puerto Rico, more than 200,000 homes have been damaged, and more than 200,000 Puerto Ricans have fled for the mainland, a few leaving pets tied up in empty homes with a bag of food.
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Carlos Giusti/AP
In this Dec. 15, 2017, photo, dog trainer Cesar Millan who's known for his TV show "Dog Whisperer," right, and Carmen Cintron, founder of Canita Sanctuary, interact with a rescue dog at the shelter that protects hundreds of cats and dogs from being euthenized in Guayama, Puerto Rico. While there are no official figures, and estimates vary wildly, activists say that the number of stray animals increased after the hurricane because many shelters were closed.
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Carlos Giusti/AP
In this Dec. 15, 2017, photo, a rescue dog looks through the fence at Carmen Cintron, founder of Canita Sanctuary, where abandoned cats and dogs are protected from being euthanized, in Guayama, Puerto Rico. After the passing of Hurricane Maria three months ago, some animals are left behind on roadsides or in empty homes, to be found eventually by crews from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency.
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Carlos Giusti/AP
In this Dec. 15, 2017, photo, dog trainer Cesar Millan known for his TV show "Dog Whisperer," pets a rescued dog at Canita Sanctuary, where abandoned cats and dogs are protected from being euthanized, in Guayama, Puerto Rico. "(The rescuers) need more help as time passes by because everybody forgets," he said, noting that animals are not the government's priority. "We have to keep it in the minds of people, in the hearts of people. There's a long way to go."
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Carlos Giusti/AP
In this Dec. 15, 2017, photo, a rescued dog remains in a pen in the Canita Sanctuary that protects hundreds of cats and dogs from being euthanized, in Guayama, Puerto Rico. In the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Maria, a variety of groups flew more than 1,000 animals to no-kill shelters on the U.S. mainland, but animal shelters are again running out of space and resources and are reporting a drop in adoptions.
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Carlos Giusti/AP
In this Dec. 15, 2017, photo, rescued dogs bark from inside their pen at Canita Sanctuary, a shelter protecting hundreds of cats and dogs from being euthanized in Guayama, Puerto Rico. Animal activist Sylvia Bedrosian said overburdened shelters are again running out of space and resources and are reporting a drop in adoptions.
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Carlos Giusti/AP
In this Dec. 15, 2017, photo, Carmen Cintron, founder of Canita Sanctuary, stands outside a pen housing a pit bull at her shelter where she protects hundreds of cats and dogs from being euthanized, in Guayama, Puerto Rico. The shelter, which suffered some damage by the whip of Hurricane Maria almost three months ago, currently houses 752 animals: 12 cats and 740 dogs.
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Carlos Giusti/AP
In this Dec. 15, 2017, photo, a rescued dog remains in a pen in the Canita Sanctuary, where abandoned cats and dogs are protected from being euthanized in Guayama, Puerto Rico. Hundreds of dogs, cats and even the occasional pet pig are being abandoned as hundreds of thousands of people continue to flee the U.S. territory or stay and try to rebuild their lives after Hurricane Maria hit the island nearly three months ago.
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Carlos Giusti/AP
In this Dec. 15, 2017, photo, a rescue dogs walks freely on the grounds of Canita Sanctuary that protects abandoned animals from being euthanized, in Guayama, Puerto Rico. Hundreds of dogs, cats and even the occasional pet pig and fighting cock have been left at shelters as people flee hardships on the U.S. territory or stay and try to rebuild their lives after the Category 4 storm that hit three months ago.
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