BOSTON

‘This Race Is Historic': Diverse Candidates Vying for Votes in Boston Mayor's Race

"Boston has always had a reputation for being a racist city, or a segregated city, and I think that these candidates represent the change that people want to see."

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Even before the results are in, the Boston mayoral race will make history with a diverse candidate pool -- made up mainly of women -- vying for people’s vote.

The race is in its final stretch before the preliminary election on Sept. 14, with only two candidates moving on to the general election.

“I think that this race is historic to say the least,” said Wellesley College Associate Professor of Africana studies Dr. Kellie Jackson.

The city has come a long way in terms of representation, noted Jackson.

"Boston has always had a reputation for being a racist city, or a segregated city, and I think that these candidates represent the change that people want to see," she said.

Jackson warns, gender and race won’t be enough to win over votes.

“I think people of color especially want to see someone who is going to go to bat for them," she said.

The Boston mayor discusses the hurdles she faced from teen pregnancy in the 80s and how her experience shaped her as a candidate for Boston's highest office.

There’s a lot of expectations for the new mayor to bring about meaningful change, from managing the pandemic, to economic recovery and public safety.

“Well housing, and I would like for them to clean up down Mass Ave., Methadone mile, that's the first thing I want them to do,” said Boston resident Gracie Coplin.

Boston resident Zack Behage seconds that motion. He hopes the diversity in the race can bring different ideas to the table.

“I think people are looking for a little more diversity in their government and obviously with that diversity comes diverse points of view as well,” said Behage.

Kim Janey, Michelle Wu, Annissa Essaibi George, Andrea Campbell, and John Barros are all candidates of color running for mayor of Boston.

"I think people want to see a person of color in power who can make a difference not just for some Boston residents but all Boston residents, particularly those who have been most marginalized,” added Jackson.

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