New Hampshire

Worcester man arrested after leading police on 100 mph chase in stolen car, striking cruiser

Steven Hebert, 42, is facing multiple charges out of Maine and New Hampshire

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FILE

A Massachusetts man is facing multiple charges after he allegedly led police on a chase through two states at speeds over 100 mph in a stolen car, striking a cruiser.

Around 11:45 p.m. Monday, a state police trooper saw a vehicle traveling north on Interstate 95 in Portsmouth at speeds over 100 mph while also having lane control issues. The trooper attempted to stop the vehicle, but it increased speed and refused to stop.

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Police gave chase, and the driver of the vehicle, a Toyota Camry reported stolen out of Wilmington, Massachusetts, continued northbound on I-95 at high speeds, crossing into Kittery, Maine. New Hampshire state trooper scontinued pursuing the car while Maine authorities responded.

The stolen vehicle exited I-95 at Exit 3, and Kittery police took over the pursuit, with New Hampshire troopers continuing to provide support. The Toyota eventually crossed into York, Maine, and traveled down a dead-end road. At this point, the driver turned around and struck a New Hampshire State Police trooper's cruiser. The crash brought the chase to an end and the driver of the Toyota was arrested without further incident. No one was injured in the crash.

The driver of the Toyota was identified by police as 42-year-old Steven Hebert, of Worcester, Massachusetts. He was arrested and taken to the Kittery Police Department. Authorities said he faces multiple charges in Maine and New Hampshire related to the pursuit and the stolen car.

Anyone with information on the incident is asked to contact Trooper Cameron Vetter at 603-223-4381.

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