Trump: GOP Health Bill Short of Votes Before Deadline - NBC Boston
President Donald Trump

President Donald Trump

The latest news on President Donald Trump's first year as president

Trump: GOP Health Bill Short of Votes Before Deadline

Republicans must act by Sept. 30 in the Senate or face the prospect of a Democratic filibuster

Find NBC Boston in your area

Channel 10 on most providers

Channel 60 and 8 Over the Air

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    An upbeat Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-South Carolina) touted his healthcare bill co-sponsored with Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-Louisiana) Tuesday, speaking to reporters after a closed-door luncheon with other law makers to push the bill. (Published Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017)

    President Donald Trump said Wednesday the Republicans' last-resort "Obamacare" repeal effort remains two or three votes short, forecasting days of furious lobbying ahead with a crucial deadline looming next week.

    The legislation by Sens. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina would repeal major pillars of former President Barack Obama's health law, replacing them with block grants to states to design their own health care programs. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is trying to round up 50 votes to pass the legislation before Sept. 30, when special rules preventing a Democratic filibuster will expire.

    "We think this has a very good chance, Obamacare is only getting worse," Trump told reporters covering the U.N. General Assembly meeting in New York. "At some point the Senate is going to be forced to make a deal."

    By his reckoning, "we're at 47 or 48 already, senators, and a lot of others are looking at it very positively."

    Kelly 'Stunned' by Rep.'s Criticism of Trump's Call to Widow

    [NATL] John Kelly 'Stunned' by Congresswoman's Criticism of Trump's Call to Fallen Soldier's Family

    White House chief of staff John Kelly said Thursday he was "stunned" and "broken hearted" by a Florida congresswoman woman's criticism of President Donald Trump's phone call to one of the families of Americans killed in Niger nearly two weeks ago.

    (Published Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017)

    Trump's comments came several hours after McConnell's office announced that the majority leader's "intention" is to bring the legislation to the Senate floor next week, a question McConnell was noncommittal on a day earlier. After the embarrassing defeat of an earlier repeal bill in July, some Republicans believe McConnell would bring a bill to the floor only with the votes in hand.

    In a Senate split 52-48 between Republicans and Democrats, McConnell has little room for error. GOP Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky has already announced his opposition, saying the bill doesn't do enough to repeal "Obamacare," while moderate Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine is also seen as a likely "no" vote.

    With Democrats unanimously opposed, McConnell cannot afford to lose even one more Republican senator. The focus is on Sens. John McCain of Arizona and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, both of whom opposed earlier versions of repeal legislation. This time may be McCain because his closest friend in the Senate, Graham, is a co-author of the bill.

    One leading Republican, Chuck Grassley of Iowa, voiced pessimism Wednesday in a phone interview with home-state reporters, saying glumly: "I think we're one or two votes short and I don't see those other votes coming and I hope I'm wrong."

    Trump touched on one of the most contentious aspects of the bill in a tweet Wednesday night, asserting: "I would not sign Graham-Cassidy if it did not include coverage of pre-existing conditions. It does! A great Bill. Repeal & Replace."

    Whether it truly does protect people with pre-existing health problems is fiercely under debate.

    Obama Returns to the Campaign Trail

    [NATL] Obama Returns to the Campaign Trail

    Former President Barack Obama returned to the political spotlight Thursday for the first time since leaving office by campaigning for the Democratic nominees for Governor in New Jersey and Virginia.

    (Published 40 minutes ago)

    Later Wednesday, Trump tweeted, "Senator (Doctor) Bill Cassidy is a class act who really cares about people and their Health(care), he doesn't lie - just wants to help people!"

    Cassidy defended the health care bill against criticism from late-night TV host Jimmy Kimmel, who jumped into the debate after his son was born with a congenital heart defect in April.

    "This guy Bill Cassidy just lied right to my face," Kimmel said on his ABC show Tuesday night, referring to Cassidy's promises to Kimmel and others that his health bill would pass the "Jimmy Kimmel test." Cassidy coined the phrase to mean that people with pre-existing conditions would have protections and not face lifetime caps on coverage from insurers.

    "We can't let 'em do this, to our children and our senior citizens and our veterans, or to any of us," Kimmel said.

    "I am sorry he does not understand," Cassidy said of Kimmel on CNN, arguing that his bill would in fact protect people with pre-existing conditions, a claim that leading health advocacy groups dispute. "I think the price will actually be lower."

    Kimmel fired back Wednesday, mocking Cassidy's claim and called his proposal "the worst health care bill yet."

    'Casual Cruelty': Bush Criticizes Current State of Politics

    [NATL] 'Casual Cruelty': George W. Bush Criticizes Current State of Politics

    Former president George W. Bush criticized the current state of American politics and the Trump administration with a pointed speech on the "casual cruelty" common in modern political discussions, as well as references to a tyrannical government, at the George W. Bush Institute on Oct. 19, 2017. 

    (Published Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017)

    Under Cassidy's legislation states would have wide latitude in creating their own health systems and requirements, and would be able to seek waivers from certain mandates including those related to coverage for people with pre-existing conditions. The bill does say that coverage must remain "adequate and affordable" for those with pre-existing conditions. But because those terms are not defined, critics fear that insurers could jack up prices beyond many people's ability to pay.

    The AARP and the American Medical Association are among those arguing against the bill, along with a bipartisan group of governors, including Alaska's Bill Walker, an independent. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a Trump ally during the campaign, said Wednesday he opposes the bill.

    In its letter of opposition, the AMA wrote that the bill "does not take steps toward coverage and access for all Americans, and while insurers are still required to offer coverage to patients with pre-existing conditions, allowing states to get waivers to vary premiums based on health status would allow insurers to charge unaffordable premiums based on those pre-existing conditions."

    Cassidy disputed such analyses, saying they come from "those who wish to preserve Obamacare, and they are doing everything they can to discredit the alternative."

    If the bill does pass, Speaker Paul Ryan will try to move it through the House as-is, and straight to the president's desk. Yet success would hold uncertain political consequences as the legislation's unpredictable ramifications, certain to be harmful for some, unfurl over the years.

    Democrats made their opposition clear.

    Sessions, Franken Clash Over Russian Communication Claims

    [NATL] Sessions, Franken Clash Over Russian Communication Claims

    Democratic Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota clashed with Attorney General Jeff Sessions during a Senate hearing on possible Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, on Oct. 18, 2017.  

    (Published Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017)

    "This is really a stinkeroo, this bill," House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi told reporters Wednesday.