No End in Sight to Partial Government Shutdown - NBC10 Boston
President Donald Trump

President Donald Trump

The latest news on President Donald Trump's presidency

No End in Sight to Partial Government Shutdown

Wednesday brings the first full business day after several government departments and agencies closed up over the weekend

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    NEWSLETTERS

    No End in Sight to Partial Government Shutdown
    Andrew Harnik/AP
    Jekabs Vidzis, 8, left, and his brother Margers, 6, visit the National Christmas Tree on the Ellipse near the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 25, 2018. Donations to the National Park Service have allowed the National Christmas Tree to be open during the partial government shutdown.

    Christmas has come and gone but the partial government shutdown is just getting started.

    Wednesday brings the first full business day after several government departments and agencies closed up over the weekend due to a budgetary stalemate between President Donald Trump and Congress. And there is no end in sight.

    So far, the public and federal workers have largely been spared inconvenience and hardship because the government is closed on weekends and federal employees were excused from work on Christmas Eve and Christmas, a federal holiday. The shutdown began at midnight last Friday.

    Trump said Tuesday that the closed parts of the government will remain that way until Democrats agree to wall off the U.S.-Mexico border to deter criminal elements. He said he's open to calling the wall something else as long as he ends up with an actual wall.

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    Asked when the government would reopen fully, Trump said he couldn't say.

    "I can't tell you when the government's going to be open. I can tell you it's not going to be open until we have a wall or fence, whatever they'd like to call it," Trump said, referring to Democrats who staunchly oppose walling off the border.

    "I'll call it whatever they want, but it's all the same thing," he told reporters after participating in a holiday video conference with representatives from all five branches of the military stationed in Alaska, Bahrain, Guam and Qatar.

    Trump argued that drug flows and human trafficking can only be stopped by a wall.

    "We can't do it without a barrier. We can't do it without a wall," he said. "The only way you're going to do it is to have a physical barrier, meaning a wall. And if you don't have that then we're just not opening" the government.

    Democrats oppose spending money on a wall, preferring instead to pump the dollars into fencing, technology and other means of controlling access to the border. Trump argued that Democrats oppose a wall only because he is for one.

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    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)

    The stalemate over how much to spend and how to spend it caused the partial government shutdown that began Saturday following a lapse in funding for departments and agencies that make up about 25 percent of the government.

    Some 800,000 government workers are affected. Many are on the job but must wait until after the shutdown to be paid again.

    Trump claimed that many of these workers "have said to me and communicated, 'stay out until you get the funding for the wall.' These federal workers want the wall. The only one that doesn't want the wall are the Democrats."

    Trump didn't say how he's hearing from federal workers, excluding those he appointed to their jobs or who work with him in the White House. But many rank-and-file workers have gone to social media with stories of the financial hardship they expect to face because of the shutdown.

    ___

    Associated Press writer Nomaan Merchant in Houston contributed to this report.

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    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)