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Climate Change in New England: Can We Adjust, and How?

Climate change is here and it's getting worse. So what can we do about it?

Climate change isn't only a problem for future generations. It's here, it’s happening right now and it's everyone's problem.

NBC10 Boston Meteorologist Chris Gloninger is diving deep into the impact of climate change here at home with his weekly reports on the crisis. What does climate change look like for New England? How is it impacting us? And how do we adjust to living with a problem that is getting worse? The damage from the climate change crisis is already happening. As it gets worse, we need to be ready to adjust.

Climate Change - The Big Picture

Three Things You Likely Didn't Know About Climate Change in New England

  • The Northeast has warmed more than any other region in the U.S. when you look at long and short time spans, according to data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
  • Sea level rise is occurring about twice as fast in coastal New England as it is in the world ocean on average, according to climate scientist Sam Miller of Plymouth State University.
  • Climate change can actually result in more snow in New England. A warmer planet evaporates more water and that water ends up in the atmosphere. If there’s more moisture in the atmosphere, storms will have more precipitation. That means downpours in the warm months and more snow in the colder months!

Climate Change and the 2020 Election

As we prepare for Super Tuesday, climate change is growing in importance for some voters.

As we prepare for Super Tuesday, climate change is growing in importance for some voters.


Climate Change Is Here and It's Time to Adjust to It, Scientists Say

There are two key concepts when it comes to climate change: mitigation and adaptation. The first is about preventing or reducing the impact of climate change by changing how we live. Scientists say we need to continue to look for ways to mitigate the impact of the climate crisis. But now that it's here, they say it's time to adapt to our new reality. So how do we do that?

Climate change isn't only a problem for future generations. It's here, it's now and it's everyone's problem.

We have started the ball rolling and it’s not going to stop. We have to prepare for the damages at the same time we have to stop the problem, otherwise it will start rolling faster and faster.

Dr. Dan Schrag, Harvard

Can New England Adjust to Rising Sea Levels and How Will That Impact Us?

Rising sea levels due to climate change mean that storms and weather events will now have a greater impact on our neighborhoods. It's already impacting our daily lives and scientists expect it to get worse.

Flooding is a way of life for some New England communities, and scientists say it’s getting worse because of climate change. Meteorologist Chris Gloninger explains why rising seas are hammering our coast and what, if anything, could be done to protect those who live there.

Obviously, coastal new England is experiencing sea level rise, and it’s occurring about twice as fast in coastal new England as it is in the world ocean on average.

Dr. Sam Miller, Plymouth State University

Climate Change: Separating the Fact From the Fiction

Climate change has long been politicized. But scientists warn that all of that rhetoric is keeping us from finding ways to adjust to the climate crisis. What are some of the most common myths about climate change and what does the science have to say about those misconceptions?

Climate change can make for a heated conversation at holiday dinners. Despite climate change being here right now, it’s still perceived as a polarizing political topic. But worry not, NBC10 Boston Meteorologist Chris Gloninger is here to break down what’s fact and what’s fiction as he clears up false claims.

We are more confident that, if anything, the model projections we’ve been running over the last 20 years are turning out to be, maybe, a little conservative.

Dr. Kerry Emanuel, MIT

Adjusting to Climate Change: Flooding in Revere Is Now the New Norm

For people in Revere, Massachusetts, climate change is all too real, bringing floodwaters onto their roads and into some of their living rooms. Even on sunny days, certain neighborhoods experience an amazing amount of flooding. Residents say the floods come 12-15 times a year now.

For people in Revere, climate change is all too real, bringing floodwaters onto their roads and into some of their living rooms.

We like being on the water, we just don’t like being in the water.

Loretta Lacentra, Revere Homeowner

The Staggering Cost of Climate Change

Two New England nor'easters are among the 115 natural disasters that cost at least $1 billion last decade. Those storms cost our region nearly $3.5 billion.

Two New England nor'easters are among the decade's 115 natural disasters that cost at least $1 billion.

This year, 2019, is on track to have more than 10 of the so-called billion-dollar weather events.

Rachel Cleetus, economist at Union of Concerned Scientists

A Global Effort Needed to Combat Climate Change Experts Say

We are already experiencing the impact of climate change, but climate scientists warn it could get a lot worse without a widespread global effort similar to what we saw during World War II.

Some of the world's leading scientists say climate change may threaten the fabric of human civilization, causing human suffering on a massive scale. They say a massive, worldwide effort is needed to prepare.

We have to fix it, we have to transition off fossil fuels and stop emitting greenhouse gases. It's just a question of how bad the situation gets.

Kerry Emanuel, professor of atmospheric science at MIT

Climate Change: How Sea Rise Could Affect Boston's Seaport

The Seaport is one of the hottest areas in Boston. But all of this new development is at risk from climate vulnerability, especially flooding.

The rapidly developing Boston Seaport District could end up underwater due to climate change.

National risk assessment experts have called out Boston and the Seaport for being the city that has put the greatest amount of new development ... exposed to the greatest amount of climate vulnerability.

Michelle Wu, Boston city councilor at large

The Economic Toll of Climate Change on Home Values

As more and more coastal communities deal with climate-related flooding, more and more homes could be left uninhabitable. That would take a toll on homeowners and the tax bases of these towns and cities.

Once a house chronically floods, its value drops dramatically, impacting the municipality as well as the homeowner.

People have these homes that no one wants to live in and, maybe in the future, no one can live in because of rising seas.

Joe Aldy, Harvard economics professor

How Climate Change Costs Homeowners Outside Flood Zones

Even if you don't own coastal property, you are paying to keep the National Flood Insurance Program afloat and that means we are all on the hook for the cost of climate change.

The National Flood Insurance Program is deeply in debt.

The National Flood Insurance Program is deeply in debt. This is a taxpayer-backed program, so we're all on the hook.

Rachel Cleetus, economist at Union of Concerned Scientists

The Pentagon Is Adapting to Climate Change

Climate change is impacting the ability of our armed forces to carry out their missions and so the Pentagon is making adjustments to how they operate in a world being impacted by climate vulnerability.

Climate change is getting so severe it could be a threat for our national security. Meteorologist Chris Gloninger looks at how the Pentagon is adapting to the change.

They cannot evade the impact of climte change on their ability to carry out their job.

Michael Klare, Hampshire College professor emeritus of peace and world security studies

Could Climate Change Derail Boston Public Transit?

The MBTA is already facing weather-related challenges with its transportation infrastructure. Can the 'T' weather the growing climate crisis and what does that mean for commuters?

About half a million people use public transit regularly in the Boston area, but rising sea levels may stop those commuters in their tracks.

I'm very concerned about our vulnerabilities. We know that the Blue Line is vulnerable, we've seen the Aquarium Station take water, and there's a lot of other low-lying areas that we haven't assessed yet.

State Sen. William Brownburger

How Geo-Engineering Could Slow Down Climate Change

Climate change is here, but can it be slowed down? Some scientists say solar geoengineering could be a solution. But that approach could also be risky.

Climate change is here, but can it be slowed down? Some scientists say solar geo-engineering could be a solution.

Solar geoengineering is the idea that humans might deliberately alter the energy balance of the earth.

Dr. David Keith, Harvard University

Coronavirus' Impact on Studying Climate Change

We're dealing with two global emergencies — despite the urgency of coronavirus, we can't wait to act on climate change.

We're dealing with two global emergencies — despite the urgency of coronavirus, we can't wait to act on climate change. Chris Gloninger looks at the impacts COVID-19 is having on our changing climate.

Coronavirus' Lesson for Climate Change

A climate researcher hopes that our society takes a lesson away from the coronavirus crisis -- believe researchers.

Meteorologist Chris Gloninger speaks with Woods Hole Research Center climate scientist Jennifer Francis about the impacts the coronavirus pandemic is having on climate research.

"We will see extreme weather, no doubt about it. The hurricane is looking very concerning. There are several factors lining up to point to a busy year.

Jennifer Francis, Woods Hole Research Group climate scientist

Rising Water Levels in Coastal New Hampshire

New Hampshire is dealing with damaged roads as the 18-mile stretch of coastline experiences rising sea levels.

The New Hampshire Seacoast is in the crosshairs of climate change.

What we look at is where the surface water is going to be coming in on top of the pavement structure but also, with sea level rise, there is ground water rise that is happening as well.

Jo Sias, University of New Hampshire professor of civil and environmental engineering

Planning for Flooding on New Hampshire's Coast

High tide could bring flooding twice a day to some coastal New Hampshire communities, but they're not just ready to accept it.

Some communities in New Hampshire are preparing for road closures twice a day, every day, because of flooding at high tide.

Do we fortify these further? Do we find areas of road that we may just have to abandon completely?

Tim Roache, Rockingham County Planning Commission executive director

What Ancient Ice Can Teach Us About Our Climate

By studying segments of ice that are thousands of years old, scientists can understand what's been in the atmosphere, and what that implies for the atmosphere today.

If scientists know what happened 2 million years ago, they can better understand how our climate may be changing now.

There are a lot of ways in which one can reconstruct past climate.

Paul Mayewski, director of the Climate Change Institute at the University of Maine
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