'Florida Man' Challenge: Stories of Guns, Drugs and Gators

It turns out there's a "Florida Man" in all of us.

A new social media challenge is urging people to look up what version of "Florida Man" they are based on their birthdays.

"Florida Man" has become shorthand for a unique brand of idiocy mined from the Sunshine State's never-ending news stories about people doing stupid stuff, usually with guns, drugs, booze or reptiles.

The challenge asks people to run their birthday and "Florida Man" in a search engine to find out what "Florida Man" headline pops up. Then, like all good things, they must post the answer on social media.

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The challenge has become a social media sensation, which isn't surprising since the idea of "Florida Man" crept into the nation's consciousness with the @_FloridaMan Twitter account.

Since the "Florida Man Challenge" first gained traction through a Twitter post, South Florida's NBC 6 has received significant traffic on numerous "Florida Man" stories.

Three stand out:

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1. Florida Man Who Told Cop He 'May Have Some Needles Between His Cheeks' Arrested on Drug Charges 2. Florida Man Tossed Over Bridge During Fight 3. Florida Man Claims Trump Bumper Sticker Motivated Road Rage Attack

Florida's Sunshine Law, a law first enacted in 1995 that grants the public access to government records, helps keep "Florida Man" alive. Many counties in Florida give the public online access to jail records – many of which provide mugshots and charges issued by police.

News outlets then have the opportunity to request additional information from law enforcement agencies, including arrest reports with possibly eyebrow-raising details.

The same standards apply for "Florida Woman" as similar stories make national headlines, such as the arrest of a Florida woman after she ran naked through a public park thinking she had a giant spider on her because she was high on drugs, according to authorities.

Another factor helping Florida unearth these tales is the fact that it's the United States' third-largest state with more than 20 million residents.