WATCH: HBO Releases Michelle Carter Documentary Trailer

The two-part documentary will debut at SXSW March 9 and later this summer on HBO

What to Know

  • HBO has released the first trailer for their upcoming documentary on the Michelle Carter case.
  • The Plainville, Massachusetts resident was sentenced to 15 months in jail for convincing Conrad Roy III to kill himself.
  • "I Love You, Now Die: The Commonwealth vs. Michelle Carter", a 2-part documentary will debut on HBO this summer.

Less than a month after a Massachusetts woman began her jail sentence for sending her suicidal boyfriend text messages urging him to kill himself, HBO has released the first trailer for their upcoming documentary on the case.

"I Love You, Now Die: The Commonwealth vs. Michelle Carter" is a two-part documentary directed by Erin Lee Carr and will debut at SXSW March 9. The documentary will premiere on HBO this summer at a yet-to-be-announced date.

The film talks about the chilling case that captured the nation's attention when a then-17-year-old Carter sent a barrage of text messages to her boyfriend Conrad Roy III, urging him to commit suicide.

Roy was 18 when he took his own life in Fairhaven in July 2017.

In dozens of text messages revealed during Carter's trial, Carter pushed Roy to end his life and chastised him when he hesitated. As Roy made excuses to put off his plans, her texts became more insistent.

"You keep pushing it off and say you'll do it but u never do. It's always gonna be that way if u don't take action," Carter texted him he on the day he died.

The documentary features family, friends and members of the community who were impacted by the case.

The 22-year-old Plainville resident was sentenced to 15 months in jail in 2017 for her role in Roy's death, but the judge allowed her to remain free while she appealed. Massachusetts' highest court upheld her conviction in February, saying her actions caused Roy's death.

Carter is now serving her sentence at the Bristol County House of Correction.

If you are in crisis, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 or reach out to the Crisis Text Line by texting 'Home' to 741741.

Copyright AP - Associated Press
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