ukraine rally

Protesters Gather in Boston to Support Ukraine

Sunday's event kicked off with a memorial service at a Ukrainian Catholic Church in Boston's Jamaica Plain neighborhood and ended with a candlelight vigil in Fenway

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Ukrainians and Ukrainian Americans in New England rallied in Boston on Sunday to stand in solidarity with the people of Ukraine, as the country is on the brink of war with Russia.

Sunday's event kicked off with a memorial service at a Ukrainian Catholic Church in Boston's Jamaica Plain neighborhood and ended with a candlelight vigil in Fenway, where dozens of people prayed for unity and peace.

The community came together Sunday, holding flags and signs, with the purpose of bringing awareness to their cause.

President Joe Biden has agreed "in principle" to a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin "provided that Russia does not proceed with military action," according to the White House.

Anton Khlebas organized the rally on the 8th anniversary of Ukraine's 'Heavenly Hundred,' to honor the sacrifice Ukrainians made in 2014 during the war with Russia. Khlebas has faith Ukrainians will standup to any Russian aggression.

"This is the time when Ukrainians need somewhere to turn to and to unite, and with unity we have strength," Khlebas said.

Khlebas' father Ihor turned to the U.S. He arrived from Ukraine a month ago and is more resolute than ever to see his country survive any attempts from Russia to invade.

"We don't know what will happen, but what we do know is that we will defend our Motherland," Ihor Khelbas said.

Protesters gathered in Washington, D.C., Sunday to show support for Ukraine.

After a religious service Sunday, dozens of rally-goers hopped in their cars and participated in a caravan from Jamaica Plain to the World War II Memorial in Fenway for the candlelight vigil -- hoping their presence will bring about enough awareness for the world to care about what is happening in Europe.

"Ukraine was at war for eight years and what is the world saying? 'Oh, it's internal conflict.' No. And that is what people have to realize," said Vladislav Chapiro, who attended Sunday's rally.

The Ukrainian community in Boston wasn't alone, as similar rallies took place Sunday in major cities across the United States, including Washington, D.C. and Minneapolis.

Late Sunday, it was announced that U.S. President Joe Biden had accepted "in principle" a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, if an invasion hasn’t happened. It’s the latest effort by the Biden Administration to persuade Putin to stop what U.S. leaders said is a planned invasion of Ukraine.

Artillery fire reported between Ukrainian forces and pro-Russian separatists in far eastern Ukraine is the latest sign of what could be the start of a renewed war between the Eastern European nations.

The U.S. intelligence agencies learned that the Russian military was given orders to proceed with an invasion.

Before returning to the U.S. from her meetings in Germany, U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris provided a sobering update: “We’re talking about the real possibility of war in Europe.”

U.S. President Joe Biden accepted "in principle" a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, if an invasion hasn’t happened. It’s the latest effort by the bidden administration to persuade Putin to stop what the White House said is a continuation by Russia to prepare for a full-scale assault on Ukraine.

As hopes to bring conflict to a diplomatic resolution continue to fade.

“We are going to try everything we possibly can to get President Putin to reverse the decision we believe he's made,” said U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken in an interview during NBC’s Meet The Press.

Blinken, who joined the emergency National Security Council meeting with Biden on Sunday, said he would meet with his Russian counterpart this week, only if Russia decides not to invade. If no meeting takes place, it will mean war would’ve already begun.

French President Emmanuel Macron spoke with Putin on the phone Sunday morning and agreed to work toward a possible ceasefire.

If all diplomatic efforts fail and Russia in fact invades Ukraine, the U.S. and its allies will impose what Harris said are the strongest economic sanctions against Russia.

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