residential kitchen permit

This Creator of Edible Cupcake Bouquets Just Made Boston Culinary History

"It's a great way to test the waters, without the enormous commitment and responsibility of a commercial space," said Lisa Mackin, who runs a cupcake business from her home

Lisa Mackin, owner and operator of Boston Baked Blooms, in her South Boston kitchen with the edible cupcakes bouquets she makes there.
Handout

Boston just awarded its first residential kitchen permit to a woman who makes edible cupcake bouquets in her Southie home. 

The permits are part of a push to help entrepreneurs get their feet in the door of the food business during the pandemic, according to an announcement from the city Wednesday.

Lisa Mackin, the owner and operator of Boston Baked Blooms, got the first one on Monday, the city announced. She said she was honored that her online cupcake business were chosen.

"It's a great way to test the waters, without the enormous commitment and responsibility of a commercial space. I feel really fortunate to be a part of it," she said in a statement.

The permits were created under a city law passed in January that allows private residents to make and sell "non-hazardous" goods like pastries, jams, jellies and spice blends in their homes. Even though the businesses are based in people's homes, there's still an oversight process that includes inspections. Read more about it here.

Mayor Kim Janey, who gave the permit to Mackin, noted in the city's announcement that the program will help people "build their dreams at home" during the pandemic.

"During the last year, many entrepreneurs had to reimagine their business models. This quick and easy permitting process will help Boston residents to earn extra income and build businesses," Janey said in a statement. 

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