Women Travel From Boston for March on Washington | NBC Boston

Women Travel From Boston for March on Washington

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Protesters from across the country will be in Washington Saturday for the Women's March, and many are coming from Boston. (Published Friday, Jan. 20, 2017)

    Tens of thousands of protesters are expected in the nation's capital Saturday to take part in the Women's March on Washington.

    "What I'm really looking forward to is proving everybody wrong who says that anti-Trump demonstrators are violent and chaotic and that we incite violence," said Winchester resident Kaitlin Conway. "We're actually the complete opposite."

    Boston Women Taking Overnight Buses to March in DC

    [NECN] Boston Women Taking Overnight Buses to March in DC
    Protesters from across the country will be in Washington Saturday for the Women's March, and many are coming from Boston.
    (Published Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017)

    The protesters' goal is to send a message to the new Donald Trump administration.

    "The way he treats people, the tone he sets, he doesn't seem to be concerned with his conflicts of interests," said Kate Schoch of Lexington.

    Many are fearful that President Trump will not be protective of women's rights, including family leave, access to abortion and equal pay.

    "I'm not as worried about him as I am about his vice president and the general mood of the country that got him elected," said Meagan Thomas of Coventry, Connecticut.

    Getting to Washington is just part of the experience. Thousands are heading down via Skedaddle, a relatively new Boston-based app that allows groups of people to coordinate bus transportation.

    "Other travel apps get you around in the city, but Skedaddle gets you out of the city," said co-founder Brad Werntz. "We enable access to new experiences such as ski mountains, concerts, beaches."

    Skedaddle says 11,000 people in several states are using the service for the Women's March, including about 2,000 people in Massachusetts.

    For Conway, the nine hour bus trip is a journey she says is worth it.

    "When I look back on my life, I want to say that I was on the right side of history," she said. "I want to be proud of who I was and what I did."