Scenes From the Border: Asylum Seekers Wait Their Turns in Tijuana

Asylum seekers wait in Tijuana, across the border from San Diego, for U.S. authorities to signal that their time has come. Lines at border crossings in California, Texas and Arizona are so busy with asylum seekers that some have to wait days, even weeks, to present themselves to U.S. border inspectors.

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TIJUANA, MEXICO - JUNE 21: Migrants (BOTTOM) wait in line on their way to the port of entry to ask for asylum in the U.S. on June 21, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. The Trump Administration's controversial zero tolerance immigration policy led to an increase in the number of migrant children who have been separated from their families at the southern U.S. border. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has added that domestic and gang violence in immigrants' country of origin would no longer qualify them for political asylum status. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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TIJUANA, MEXICO - JUNE 21: A migrant mother walks with her two daughters and their belongings on their way to the port of entry to ask for asylum in the U.S. on June 21, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. The mother, who did not wish to give their names, said they were fleeing their hometown near the Pacific coast of Mexico after suffering a violent carjacking of her taxicab. The Trump Administration's controversial zero tolerance immigration policy led to an increase in the number of migrant children who have been separated from their families at the southern U.S. border. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has added that domestic and gang violence in immigrants' country of origin would no longer qualify them for political asylum status. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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A migrant mother sits with three of her four daughters in a shelter for migrant women and children on June 20, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. The mother, who did not want her name published, said they are seeking asylum in the U.S. after being forced from their home due to death threats. President Trump signed an executive action reversing a decision on the separation of migrant children today. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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A migrant mother (CENTER R) waits with her two daughters and other asylum seekers (BOTTOM R) on their way to the port of entry to ask for asylum in the U.S. on June 21, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. The mother, who did not wish to give their names, said they were fleeing their hometown near the Pacific coast of Mexico after suffering a violent carjacking of her taxicab. The Trump Administration's controversial zero tolerance immigration policy led to an increase in the number of migrant children who have been separated from their families at the southern U.S. border. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has added that domestic and gang violence in immigrants' country of origin would no longer qualify them for political asylum status. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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Local residents walk along the Mexico side of the U.S.-Mexico border on June 19, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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A woman walks past images of those who perished attempting to migrate from Mexico into the United States along the Mexico side of the U.S.-Mexico border fence on June 19, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. U.S. President Trump's Mexican border policy has raised worldwide controversy in recent days as Republicans attempt to pass an immigration reform bill. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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In this June 13, 2018 photo, an organizer speaks to families as they wait to request political asylum in the United States, across the border in Tijuana, Mexico. In Tijuana, Latin Americans fleeing drug violence in their countries are camped out and waiting to apply for U.S. asylum - undeterred by the new directive from Attorney General Jeff Sessions this week to bar victims of gang violence from qualifying. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
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In this June 13, 2018 photo, an organizer, foreground, speaks to families as they wait to request political asylum in the United States, across the border in Tijuana, Mexico. In Tijuana, Latin Americans fleeing drug violence in their countries are camped out and waiting to apply for U.S. asylum - undeterred by the new directive from Attorney General Jeff Sessions this week to bar victims of gang violence from qualifying. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
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In this Monday, June 4, 2018 photo, volunteer Carlos Salio, left, interviews people seeking political asylum in the United States in Tijuana, Mexico, just across the U.S. border south of San Diego. The Trump administration's fighting words for asylum seekers don't appear to be having much impact at U.S. border crossings with Mexico. Lines keep growing, so much that U.S. authorities can't take them all at once. (AP Photo/Elliot Spagat)
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In this Monday, June 4, 2018 photo, volunteer Carlos Salio, second from right, interviews people seeking political asylum in the United States in Tijuana, Mexico, just across the U.S. border south of San Diego. The Trump administration's fighting words for asylum seekers don't appear to be having much impact at U.S. border crossings with Mexico. Lines keep growing, so much that U.S. authorities can't take them all at once. (AP Photo/Elliot Spagat)
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In this Monday, June 4, 2018 photo, a volunteer interviews people seeking political asylum in the United States in Tijuana, Mexico, just across the U.S. border south of San Diego. The Trump administration's fighting words for asylum seekers don't appear to be having much impact at U.S. border crossings with Mexico. Lines keep growing, so much that U.S. authorities can't take them all at once. Some volunteers tell people they might have to wait up to three weeks. (AP Photo/Elliot Spagat)
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In this Monday, June 4, 2018 photo, volunteer Carlos Salio, right, interviews people seeking political asylum in the United States in Tijuana, Mexico, just across the U.S. border south of San Diego. The Trump administration's fighting words for asylum seekers don't appear to be having much impact at U.S. border crossings with Mexico. Lines keep growing, so much that U.S. authorities can't take them all at once. (AP Photo/Elliot Spagat)
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A migrant who traveled with the annual caravan of Central American migrants plays with a soccer ball as the group waits for access to request asylum in the US, at a camp they set up outside the El Chaparral port of entry building at the US-Mexico border in Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, April 30, 2018. About 200 people in a caravan of Central American asylum seekers waited on the Mexican border with San Diego for a second straight day on Monday to turn themselves in to U.S. border inspectors, who said the nation's busiest crossing facility did not have enough space to accommodate them. (AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik)
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Migrants cheer and celebrate after hearing the news U.S. border inspectors allowed some of the Central American asylum-seekers to enter the country for processing, in Tijuana, Mexico, Tuesday, May 1, 2018, ending a brief impasse over lack of space. (AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik)
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Migrants wait for access to request asylum in the US, at the El Chaparral port of Entry in Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, April 30, 2018. bout 200 people in a caravan of Central American asylum seekers waited on the Mexican border with San Diego for a second straight day on Monday to turn themselves in to U.S. border inspectors, who said the nation's busiest crossing facility did not have enough space to accommodate them. (AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik)
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A migrant child from El Salvador plays under a tarpaulin at the El Chaparral port of Entry, in Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, April 30, 2018. bout 200 people in a caravan of Central American asylum seekers waited on the Mexican border with San Diego for a second straight day on Monday to turn themselves in to U.S. border inspectors, who said the nation's busiest crossing facility did not have enough space to accommodate them. (AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik)
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A two-year-old child from Honduras gets treatment for an ear infection after sleeping in the open in front of the El Chaparral port of entry, in Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, April 30, 2018. About 200 people in a caravan of Central American asylum seekers waited on the Mexican border with San Diego for a second straight day on Monday to turn themselves in to U.S. border inspectors, who said the nation's busiest crossing facility did not have enough space to accommodate them. (AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik)
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Central Americans who travel with a caravan of migrants they walk towards the border before crossing the border and request asylum in the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, April 29, 2018. A group of Central Americans who journeyed in a caravan to the U.S. border resolved to turn themselves in and ask for asylum Sunday in a direct challenge to the Trump administration - only to have U.S. immigration officials announce that the San Diego crossing was already at capacity. (AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik)
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Central Americans who travel with a caravan of migrants embrace in Tijuana, Mexico, before crossing the border and request asylum in the United States, Sunday, April 29, 2018. A group of Central Americans who journeyed in a caravan to the U.S. border resolved to turn themselves in and ask for asylum Sunday in a direct challenge to the Trump administration - only to have U.S. immigration officials announce that the San Diego crossing was already at capacity. (AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik)
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Central Americans who travel with a caravan of migrants embrace in Tijuana, Mexico, before crossing the border and request asylum in the United States, Sunday, April 29, 2018. U.S. immigration lawyers are telling Central Americans in a caravan of asylum-seekers that traveled through Mexico to the border with San Diego that they face possible separation from their children and detention for many months. They say they want to prepare them for the worst possible outcome. (AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik)
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Members of a Central American family traveling with a caravan of migrants prepare to cross the border and apply for asylum in the United States, in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, April 29, 2018. A group of Central Americans who journeyed in a caravan to the U.S. border resolved to turn themselves in and ask for asylum Sunday in a direct challenge to the Trump administration - only to have U.S. immigration officials announce that the San Diego crossing was already at capacity. (AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik)
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Central American migrants sit on top of the border wall on the beach in San Diego during a gathering of migrants living on both sides of the border, Sunday, April 29, 2018.
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Central American migrants traveling with a caravan sit momentarily on top of the border wall during a gathering of migrants living on both sides of the border, on the beach where the border wall ends in the ocean, with Tijuana, Mexico at left and San Diego at right, Sunday, April 29, 2018.
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Central American migrants sit on top of the border wall on the beach in San Diego during a gathering of migrants living on both sides of the border, Sunday, April 29, 2018.
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Central American migrants sit on top of the border wall on the beach during a gathering of migrants living on both sides of the border, Sunday, April 29, 2018, in San Diego.
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Central American children who are traveling with a caravan of migrants, look at the border wall from a bus carrying the group to a gathering of migrants living on both sides of the border, in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, April 29, 2018.
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A Central American child who is traveling with a caravan of migrants, peers at the border wall from a bus carrying the group to a gathering of migrants living on both sides of the border, in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, April 29, 2018.
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A Central American child who is traveling with a caravan of migrants, peers from a bus carrying the group to the border wall for a gathering of migrants living on both sides of the border, in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, April 29, 2018. The sign reads in Spanish: We're all brother countries from the Americas. Free transit. Stop the deportations." (AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik)
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A member of the Central American migrant caravan, holding a child, looks through the border wall toward a group of people gathered on the U.S. side, near the beach where the border wall ends in the ocean, in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, April 29, 2018.
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Central American migrants sit on top of the border wall during a gathering of migrants living on both sides of the border, on the beach where the border wall ends in the ocean, Sunday, April 29, 2018, in San Diego.
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Central American migrants sit on top of the border wall on the beach during a gathering of migrants living on both sides of the border, Sunday, April 29, 2018, in San Diego.
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Central American migrants sit on top of the border wall on the beach in San Diego during a gathering of migrants living on both sides of the border, Sunday, April 29, 2018.
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A father and his son await tutorship by immigration lawyers in Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, April 27, 2018.
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Migrants walk to the place where met with immigration lawyers before attempting to enter the United States from Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, April 27, 2018.
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A migrant child from Honduras looks across the US-Mexico Border from Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, April 27, 2018.
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