Navy Warship Sunk by German Sub in WWII Finally Located Off Coast of Maine - NBC10 Boston

Navy Warship Sunk by German Sub in WWII Finally Located Off Coast of Maine

A diver using sonar located the USS Eagle PE-56 off Cape Elizabeth in June 2018

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    This undated photo provided by the U.S. Navy shows an Eagle class patrol boat built during World War I. It is similar to the USS Eagle PE-56, which exploded and sank off Cape Elizabeth, Maine, on April 23, 1945, killing most of its crew in New England's worst naval disaster during World War II. The Navy determined in 2001 that it had been sunk by a German submarine. On Monday, July 15, 2019, Garry Kozak, a specialist in undersea searches, announced that Ryan King, a New Hampshire diver, used sonar data to locate the vessel's bow and stern about three miles off Cape Elizabeth in June 2018.

    A private dive team has found the last U.S. Navy warship to be sunk by a German submarine in World War II.

    The sinking of the USS Eagle PE-56 on April 23, 1945, was originally blamed on a boiler explosion. But the Navy determined in 2001 that it had been sunk by a German submarine.

    Its exact location remained a mystery — until now.

    Expert Garry Kozak announced this week that a diver used sonar data to locate the vessel's bow and stern in June 2018. The wreckage is about 5 miles off the coast of Cape Elizabeth, Maine.

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    The Eagle was towing a practice target for dive bombers when it sank. Only 13 of the 62 crew members survived. Several reported seeing a submarine.


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