Boston

Ahead of move-in day, Boston has tips: ‘There's a reason it's out in the trash'

While household items may be left on the sidewalk, there are some larger things that can't be, including TVs, air conditioners, refrigerators and, as of recently, mattresses and box springs

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Boston city officials on Thursday shared how they are preparing for student move-in day on Friday.

Sept. 1 is typically the busiest moving day of the year in Boston since leases generally start on the first of the month and the fall college semester is getting started at most city schools. It's affectionately known as "Allston Christmas" because of all of the furniture and other possessions that get left curbside as people move out and new tenants move in.

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Members of the Office of Neighborhood Services are set to fan out across the city through the weekend to answer questions and flag any issues they spot. Anyone with questions about moving in was urged to call 311 or visit the city's 311 app.

"We are thrilled to welcome students, families and visitors through the weekend. I’m grateful to the many City workers and departments who have started preparations and will be working throughout the coming days to ensure that all of our new residents have safe housing, access to City services and all the information they need," Mayor Michelle Wu said in a statement.

The city had some timely warnings, especially around furniture found on the street for Allston Christmas.

While household items may be left on the sidewalk, there are some larger things that can't be, including TVs, air conditioners, refrigerators and, as of recently, mattresses and box springs. People getting rid of those items of furniture need to make an appointment for pickup through 311, the city said.

And for anyone picking up furniture off the street, the city points out it has pest control information here.

"There's a reason it's out in the trash. Leave it there," said Sean Lydon, the interim commissioner of Boston's Inspectional Services Department.

Between packing, cleaning and unloading, people may not think about things like apartment inspections or fire safety plans, but Boston Fire Marshal Patrick Ellis said new residents, especially young people on their own for the first time, shouldn't wait until something goes wrong.

"I can't tell you how many fires we have because candles are misused," he said.

For more on move-in day preparations in Boston, visit the city's dedicated site.

It is not uncommon to see moving trucks or other large vehicles stuck under the low bridges on Storrow Drive. The state is trying to drive down those numbers with new signage.

The state has been preparing for move-in day as well, by adding new signs aimed at preventing out-of-towners from "Storrowing" their rental trucks on parkways in Boston and Cambridge.

And the Department of Conservation and Recreation on Thursday put out its latest in a social media push to raise awareness about the roads as well.

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