hot day

Mass. Residents Find Ways to Beat the Heat Amid Pandemic

The stifling hot weather led Boston Mayor Marty Walsh to declare a heat emergency in the city for Sunday and Monday.

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On one of the hottest days of the year across New England, people in Massachusetts found several ways to beat the heat. Parents say they just needed to get their kids out of the house after spending the past four months inside due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Beach goers at Wollaston Beach in Quincy attempted to get some relief from the sweat-drenching temps by going into the water. 

“It’s extremely hot. The sand is burning our feet but we’re staying in the shade and letting the kids play in the water,” said Rosely Batista. 

The stifling hot weather led Boston Mayor Marty Walsh to declare a heat emergency in the city for Sunday and Monday. Sunday officially marked the hottest day of 2020 for the city of Boston.

“Yesterday we stayed in the house and got a little bored, so we figured this was a good way to social distance and get some fresh air,” said Nanette Freiberger. 

In some areas, the early afternoon high tides limited beach space. At Wollaston Beach, though, everyone was spaced out. 

Some even came later in the day, when it was a little more tolerable. 

And while it was a scorcher, people say they know how cold New England can get, and they’ll take these hot temperatures while they can. 

Dominic Freiberger said he was working Saturday and was just “happy to be at the beach, cool down, go in the water and cool down.” 

Getting plenty of hydration, including water, was also key, as the heat index Sunday was over 100 in many places. 

The stifling hot weather led Boston Mayor Marty Walsh to declare a heat emergency in the city for Sunday and Monday. Sunday officially marked the hottest day of 2020 for the city of Boston.

"It’s a little warm,” said Paul Szkolnik, who was visiting from New York.

On the scorching mid-July day, as state parks in Massachusetts turned visitors away after reaching maximum capacity, there were plenty of ways to cool off in Boston.

Some people hit up the Kennedy Greenway fountains with their kids.

“That water thing over there — it’s amazing because I got shot with water,” said David Thurston, also visiting from New York.

New Englanders flocked to beaches in the region on a scorching mid-July day.

Others hit the beaches to jet ski and paddle board.

"You are just always sweating,” one woman said of the high heat.

Some stopped by the Tobin Community Center in Roxbury to hang out in the pool since the city still hasn't opened its own pools.

But for those who didn't want to cool off outside, staying home is always an option, too.

“I think I'm going to be in the A/C,” one woman said of her plans.

If you plan on heading out to a community center anytime soon, though, there are restrictions. You'll need to bring a mask, socially distance yourself from others, and only one small bag is permitted. 

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